5 Netflix Documentaries That Will Leave You Shooketh

There are facts that have somehow become myths and there are unsolved mysteries that terrify us to the core. In the end, we must remember that there are people behind the most shocking, real-life horrors that have swept our nation. Thanks to Netflix, we have the opportunity to discover some of these stories and the truths they are attempting to convey.

Amidst the chaos and sensationalism surrounding these tragedies, there are faces that have haunted us for years. It certainly makes you wonder how others see the world and how that might one day directly affect you — or someone you know. After all, there’s nothing more frightening than realizing that common sense, compassion, and human decency are not found in every living person. 

Below, we have listed the 5 Netflix documentaries that will leave you shooketh. Be warned: These films will make you question the world or make look over your shoulder every time you are alone. 

1. Killer Legends (2014)

Ever wonder who the real Candy Man was? I’ll give you a hint: It has something to do with our fear of finding razor blades in Halloween candy.

Killer Legends follows investigators Rachel Mills and Joshua Zeman as they travel around the United States in an attempt to separate fact from fiction. Together, they unearth some of the most terrifying true stories that have plagued the nation — including the infamous clown named Pogo. As Mills and Zeman visit crime scenes and look through files and photos of victims, we move one step closer to understanding the effect these stories have had on our country and the role we have as “survivors” in keeping these stories alive.

2. Voyeur (2017)

A little more than two years ago, I came across an article in the New Yorker called “The Voyeur’s Motel” which was written by renowned non-fiction writer, Gay Talese. Reading the article, I had no idea that a documentary was in the works — or that two years from then — I’d have the opportunity to put a face to the man who watched others while they slept. 

In Voyeur, we learn about Gay Talese and how he came into contact with Gerald Foos, the owner of the Manor House Motel in Colorado. We hear about how Foos created a motel with the sole purpose of watching his guests without them knowing. We hear Foos describe — and attempt to make sense of — how he watched people through vents in the ceiling and how he meticulously recorded what he witnessed.

Not only did Foos watch his guests all night long, he planned experiments to analyze their behavior. He once hid sex toys in the motel rooms to see what his guests would do with them!

All of this momentarily comes to a halt when Foos witnesses a murder in one of his rooms — one that he’s partially responsible for. What he does next, however, will make your blood run cold. 

3. White Right: Meeting The Enemy (2017)

Sometimes trying to understand the logic behind another’s argument leaves you more confused than where you started from.

In White Right: Meeting the Enemy, we follow activist and filmmaker, Deeyah Khan, as she tries to piece together the mentality of one of the most terrifying forces to currently plague our nation: White supremacists.

Though white supremacists and their ideology have been around for decades, there’s no question that the latest wave of white supremacy correlates with the last presidential election. As they embrace the Nazi symbol, KKK garbs, and rhetoric that excludes people of color or different lifestyles — calling for their extermination — Khan attempts to understand where this anger comes from and why it’s tied to the way white supremacists choose to demonstrate racial pride. 

4. Who Took Johnny (2014)

If you grew up in the ’80s and ’90s, you know milk cartons once featured the faces of missing children. You might even remember some of them staring back at you while you ate your morning cereal. 

This phenomenon all began in 1982 when the first face appeared on a milk carton — it belonged to John David Gosch. One morning, Johnny was out delivering the papers (with his little, red wagon) but he was never to be seen again. 

Who Took Johnny primarily focuses on Johnny’s mother thirty years after his disappearance and depicts her struggle to uncover the truth about what happened that morning in Iowa. The documentary reveals the long-term effects that child abduction had — and continues to have — on our country.  

5. Casting JonBenet (2017)

If you’re like me, you remember her face all over magazines and newsstands in grocery stores. This was a time before Honey Boo Boo and the lightness of Toddlers and Tiaras. There was no escaping 6-year-old beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey or her death. 

Casting JonBenet is a documentary that covers her unsolved death, taking a very different approach to how it presents her story. In fact, multiple actors portray JonBenet and her family by reenacting scenes of what might have happened. 

As Casting JonBenet moves closer and closer towards her death, you can’t help but feel chills when you realize how many 6-year-old girls turned out to play the role of JonBenet for the documentary. Not only are these little girls running around in costumes very similar to those JonBenet wore, but all  of them are from JonBenet’s hometown. It’s disturbing because the girls truly don’t understand the gravity of this elusive, unforgettable tragedy they are portraying. Instead, they are mesmerized by the idea of becoming associated with an American legend.

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