Georgian five-bed home on River Avon with hits market for £2.5million

Georgian five-bed home on River Avon with stunning views of Norman castle razed by Oliver Cromwell and 11th century priory hits market for £2.5million

  • Bridge Place in Christchurch, Dorset, which has views of Norman castle has gone on the market for £2.5m
  • The castle was built in about 1074AD and captured by the Parliamentarians in 1644, during the civil war
  • It has the longest parish church in England, with a nave 311ft long and the Priory’s Miraculous Beam

A riverside property that has spectacular views of a ruined Norman castle and the longest parish church in England has gone on the market for £2.5m.

Bridge Place in Christchurch, Dorset, sits on the River Avon and comes with a private mooring.

But as well as water lovers, the Georgian house is perfect for history buffs.

It looks out on to the 11th century Christchurch Priory and Christchurch Castle and its 850-year-old Constable’s House.

Bridge Place in Christchurch, (pictured) Dorset, which has views of Norman castle has gone on the market for £2.5milion 

 The Georgian house sits right by the picturesque River Avon and includes a private mooring on the river

But as well as water lovers, the Georgian house is perfect for history buffs as it is steeped in history that dates back to the English civil war

The new owners can enjoy sunny afternoons in the garden room (pictured) which adjoins the main house 

The current owners have lived in the five bed house for more than 30 years but are now looking to downsize as their family have grown up and moved out.

Bridge Place has many period features, including a tiled floor in the reception hall and original architraves.

The master bedroom and living room have bow windows to make the most of the views across the river to the listed buildings.

The house has 3,613 sq ft of accommodation with an entrance hall, kitchen/breakfast room, dining room, lobby, sitting room, garden room, five bedrooms, two bathrooms and a double garage.

The landscaped garden makes the most of the unique river views.

The castle was built in about 1074AD, originally a motte and bailey. A stone hall was added in 1150, with a stone keep added in 1310.

The Georgian house not only has views over the ruins, which date back almost a century, but also an 850-year-old Constable’s House and the Grade I listed Christchurch Priory

Bridge Place has many period features, including a tiled floor in the reception hall and original architraves

The current owners have lived in the five bed house for more than 30 years but are now looking to downsize

The house has 3,613 sq ft of accommodation and is fitted with five bedrooms, the master room looking right over the river (pictured) 

ENGLAND DIVIDED: A NATION DESCENDS INTO CIVIL WAR

When King Charles I (pictured) took the throne in 1625

When King Charles I took the throne in 1625, his reign was met with almost immediate murmurs of discontent.

His was a style of governance defined by religious dogma and a stubborn opposition to parliamentary rule.

This bred feelings of alienation and deep mistrust in pockets of England, while in Scotland tensions with the English boiled over into bloody conflict.

The embattled king was forced to form a parliament in 1640, and within this a vocal and highly critical Puritan faction began to grow.

When a violent Catholic rebellion broke out in Ireland, disagreements over how to respond split England in two, and in 1642 the English Civil War broke out.

The Royalists, based largely in the north and west, fought for the king, while the Roundheads, also known as Parliamentarians, came mainly from the south and east.

They took their nickname from their preference for closely cropped hair, which set them apart from the ringlets of courtly Royalists.

The battles that followed saw Charles’s forces, bolstered by the Welsh and Cornish, clash with a Roundhead army swollen with Londoners.

The Royalists looked to be on the brink of victory in 1643, until their enemies joined forces with the Scots.

In 1644, the king’s men suffered a crushing defeat at Marston Moor, North Yorkshire, effectively conceding the north. A further loss at Naseby, Northamptonshire, was the final nail in the coffin.

The king gave himself up to the Scots and they promptly passed him on to their Roundhead allies, who were in the early stages of establishing a republican regime.

He was executed in 1649, but not before inciting further clashes known as the Second Civil War. 

It was captured by the Parliamentarians in 1644, during the Civil War, and Oliver Cromwell then ordered it be destroyed in 1652 so the powerful stronghold could not fall into Royalist hands again.

Constable’s House is Grade I listed, dates from 1160, and has a rare example of a Norman chimney, one of only five examples in England.

The Priory was built in 1094 and would have been destroyed following the dissolution of the monasteries but the townspeople pleaded with the King not to pull it down.

Today it is the longest parish church in England, with a nave 311ft long, and the Priory’s Miraculous Beam – a legend associated with Jesus – attracts pilgrims from all over the world.

The castle was built in about 1074AD, originally a motte and bailey. A stone hall was added in 1150, with a stone keep added in 1310

It was captured by the Parliamentarians in 1644, during the Civil War, and Oliver Cromwell then ordered it be destroyed

he Priory was built in 1094 and would have been destroyed following the dissolution of the monasteries

Lynn Kravos from estate agents Saxe Coburg said: ‘The house is right on the water’s edge, but not only have you got the spectacular river views, it is also looking out towards the Constable’s House, the castle ruins and the Priory.

‘It’s really picturesque and there’s a lot of heritage there as well.

‘There are other properties that have the river view, but not all the historic ruins as well, it really is quite special, I don’t know of any other property that has that.

‘It’s a very photographed spot and has been in a lot of magazines.

‘The property itself has got an awful lot of character features and would make a pretty special family home or equally a riverside retreat. It would most definitely appeal to an artist or photographer and be a source of inspiration.

‘It’s a rare opportunity.’ 

It has the longest parish church in England, with a nave 311ft long and the Priory’s Miraculous Beam which attracts pilgrims from across the world 

Constable’s House is Grade I listed, dates from 1160, and has a rare example of a Norman chimney, one of only five examples in England

The landscaped garden makes the most of the unique river views, which can be seen from different angles around the house 

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