Prince Albert and Princess Charlene's Twins Jacques and Gabriella Star in New Family Portrait

A new royal portrait!

Just in time for Christmas, and only days before the royal twins turn five, the 700-year old House of Grimaldi debuted its latest family portrait.

The new official portrait, which shows Prince Albert II with wife Princess Charlene and twins Prince Jacques and Princess Gabriella standing in front of the principality’s seal and motto Deo Juvante (‘With God’s Help’), was “hung up” on the Palace’s Facebook page on Sunday afternoon.

Shot by palace photographer Eric Mathon, in the image Albert wears a grey suit while standing beside Charlene, who wears a dark teal dress. Standing front and center, Jacques wears a dark blue suit while his twin sister opts for a pale lace dress. In an extra sweet touch, both parents are posed in a way where they’re each holding onto one of their children’s hands.

The new portrait will go sale in boutiques and shops in the principality on Wednesday. All proceeds are earmarked for specific charity and humanitarian works.

The new portrait arrives just days after Jacques debuted his first-ever custom-made uniform at the annual National Day ceremony.

“Yes, he’s being outfitted this year. I think they still have one fitting to do but he’ll be in a uniform. And that’ll be great fun,” Albert previously told PEOPLE.

Prince Jacques and Princess Gabriella

Jacques looked sharp in his uniform, and even appeared at the window wearing a red, white and blue helmet to complete the look.

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The royal dad told PEOPLE last month that he and wife are committed to easing their children into royal duties as comfortably as possible.

“I think it’s always better to bring them in slowly to official situations,” he said.

Prince Albert, Prince Jacques and Princess Gabriella

“Sometimes it’s been a little flustering for them when they enter a room full of people staring at them. We’ve had some moments where understandably they were a little taken aback by that, so we have to try to accompany them in these kinds of situations,” he added. “They’ve become very used to dealing with public appearances if it’s not too long, too taxing and not too overbearing for them.”

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