Is your child suffering from ‘text neck’?

Is your child suffering from ‘text neck’? Rampant mobile phone use sees kids as young as eight diagnosed with ‘whiplash-like’ symptoms that can require months of treatment

  • Children as young as eight are being diagnosed with what’s called ‘text neck’ 
  • Physiotherapist Felicity Kermode said it involves having your head down
  • Student Olivia Stewart said you get a bit of a sore neck and headaches
  • There is 27 kilos of pressure on your neck when you tilt your head at 60 degrees 

Most children are wary of getting sore eyes when they spend hours in front of a screen or scrolling through their phones.

And while it’s a very real concern, it’s ‘text neck’ they should really be trying to avoid, with Yahoo 7 suggesting children as young as eight are being diagnosed with the condition.

‘Text neck is a range of symptoms related to having your head down for a long period of time using a mobile device,’ Physiotherapist Felicity Kermode said.

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Children as young as eight are being diagnosed with the ‘text neck’ condition

‘In extreme cases the pain could prevent them from participating in sport or even getting through a full day at school.’

One young woman who knows about the struggles of text neck is that of student Olivia Stewart.

The teenager said she had a bit of a sore neck, upper back pain and was getting headaches when she was diagnosed.

‘Text neck is a range of symptoms related to having your head down for a long period of time using a mobile device,’ Physiotherapist Felicity Kermode (pictured) said

It requires months of physiotherapy work to reverse, with maneuvers like those used to treat whiplash used.

And the dangerous positions your neck shouldn’t be in are extremely easy to do on a day to day basis. 

There is typically four or five kilos of pressure on your neck when your head sits upright, typically how you’d walk down the street.

One young woman who knows about the struggles of text neck is that of student Olivia Stewart (pictured)

But the moment you bend even 30 degrees forward that weight dramatically increases to 18 kilos, and becomes 27 kilos at 60 degrees. 

The easiest solution is to hold the phone at eye level for most of your use and to take frequent breaks when you’re in front of a screen.

Keeping your shoulders back and your back straight also forces your neck to be in a neutral position.  

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