Coronavirus cleaning: The 6 tips you need to stay healthy amid coronavirus outbreak

You’re already meticulously washing your hands and using hand sanitiser on public transport, but that doesn’t mean you are safe. Queen of clean Aggie MacKenzie revealed to the Sun her top hygiene and cleaning tips to keep coronavirus away from your home.

1. Transport

Hopping on the bus or train to work is unavoidable for most of us, but it is much better to cycle or walk to work if you can.

If you really have to use public transport, do not touch the hand rail and carry hand sanitiser with you. 

Clean your car regularly, and if you share a car with anyone you should clean the steering wheel before and after every journey.

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2. Laundry

Contrary to popular belief, washing your underwear, towels and bed linen at anything more than 40C is a waste of time if you are using a biological washing powder.

Aggie suggests keeping the temperature at just under 40C and tumble drying on high for 28 minutes minimum.

This will kill all harmful micro-organisms and keep your laundry a coronavirus-free zone.

Try to designate a set of towels and bedsheets to each family member to stay extra safe.

On sunny days, hang your washing outsideon the line right under the sun- the sun’s UV rays kill germs.

Make sure you wash your childrens teddies, too, as germs are easily spread by children sharing their toys.

Wash soft toys at 60C in the washing machine, but pop hard toys in the dishwasher.

3. Kitchen

Aggie advises washing all crockery and cutlery in the dishwasher at the highest temperature, as coronavirus can reportedly survive for five days on stainless steel, glass, ceramics, and plastics.

Alternatively, purchase a thick pair of rubber gloves and scrub using water as hot as comfortable.

Scrap germ-breeding tea towels and stick to air-drying your crockery and cutlery.

As usual, wash your hands before cooking or eating anything- even if it’s just a snack!

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4. Cleaning untensils and devices

Wash your cloths on the top shelf of the dishwasher, or stick them in the microwave when damp for a couple of minutes (she stresses the word damp, as the cloth will catch on fire if dry!)

Place brushes and cloths in a bowl of warm water and bleach and rinse after a few hours.

While it’s not certain if viruses can spread from the floor, it’s better to be safe than sorry.

Since you’ll be using your vacuum cleaner to suck up the dirt, you must make sure you empty it frequently.

Aggie also noted that you should mop your hard floors with a light disinfectant or probiotic cleaner.

If you have carpet flooring or rugs, you could hire a carpet cleaner to do the job for you if you’d like a really thorough clean.

5. Frequently touched items

Your most frequently touched items are another thing you need to look out for. 

With pens and pencils, you need to keep them to yourself where possible. 

In this tech-obsessed world, it’s important we thoroughly clean our remote controls and mobile phones twice a day with a cloth and distilled clear vinegar.

Aggie points out, though, that the cloth needs to be as dry as possible to avoid damaging these items. 

Don’t share your mobile phone with anyone either- no matter whether it’s someone known to you or a stranger. 

Keeping your money to yourself is difficuly, of course, but you should aim to use contactless payments as much as you can.

Don’t forget about your precious pets at home… there is no evience that pets can be infected with coronavirus, but that’s not to say that they won’t become ill.

The founder of Hong Kong-based Lifelong Animal Protection Charity (LAP) Sheila McClelland wrote in a letter to Hong Kong authorities: “Present evidence suggests that dogs are no more of a risk of spreading (coronavirus) than inanimate objects such as door handles.”

You don’t need to neglect your pets of a cuddle, just make sure you wash your hands before and after you touch them.

6.Handles and banisters

Coronavirus enjoys lurking on handles and rails, and it’s believed the virus could linger on handles for up to nine days- yikes!

Use a probiotic cleaning spray to encourage good bacteria to harbour on the handles and rails instead of harmful bacteria.

When you are out and about, try not to touch handles and surfaces with your bare hands.

Make a note of when you do, and sanitise or wash your hands as soon as you can.

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