'Little Fires Everywhere': Megan Stott On Izzy's 'Very Timely' Change From the Book (Video)

Scott tells TheWrap Hulu’s update to Celeste Ng’s novel makes the 1990s-era setting even more relevant

To say that Hulu’s adaptation of “Little Fires Everywhere” takes some major departures of Celeste Ng’s popular novel would be an understatement.

And on of the biggest changes is how showrunner Liz Tigelaar handles the character of Isabella “Izzy” Richardson (Megan Stott), the youngest of Richardson clan. The teenager is the same rebellious character she was in the book, often spitting in the face of pretty much anything her mother Elena (Reese Witherspoon) wants. But the Hulu version added a lesbian subplot to Izzy’s story, to better illustrate just how much Izzy feels different than the rest of her siblings.

Scott told TheWrap that the show adds “expanded more” of the “seeds” of the book. “I think it was very cool just to see those things happening. And I think they did a great job,” she told TheWrap in the video you can watch above. “I think that it’s just their adaptation and just expanding upon what was already there.”

“Little Fires Everywhere” mostly takes place in 1997, which makes Izzy’s coming out story even more noteworthy since LGBTQ acceptance was not as widespread as it is today. And yet, Stott explains, that made it even more contemporary because all the issues the show portrays — LGBTQ, motherhood, class, race relations — are still issues that society struggles with in 2020.

“I think that it was a very different time,” Stott continues. “But I think again, there are a lot of issues that are being portrayed in the show. They’re very timely and the things like race and motherhood and class and social justices. Those are all things that are happening right here in today’s time. It’s just that was the ’90s. Now it’s the 21st century.”

Watch the full video above, including Stott’s thoughts on ’90s fads and how she and her family are practicing social distancing amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The sixth episode of “Little Fires Everywhere” premieres Wednesday, April 8 on Hulu.

All the Broadway Shows Killed (and Postponed) Due to Coronavirus Shutdown

  • When New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo closed Broadway theaters on March 12 in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the New York theater scene was heating up ahead of the Tony Awards — with 31 shows playing and another eight scheduled to begin performances by mid-April. But the uncertainty of when theaters (and Broadway-bound tourists) might return has forced some producers to close shows early — or push new productions to sometime in the future.

  • Closed: “Hangmen” 

    Martin McDonagh’s new comedy, starring Dan Stevens (“Downton Abbey”) and Mark Addy (“Game of Thrones”), announced March 20 it would not reopen after playing 13 preview performances ahead of an expected March 19 official opening.

  • Closed: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” 

    The revival of Edward Albee’s classic drama, starring Laurie Metcalf and Rupert Everett, had played just nine preview performances before Broadway went dark. With the scheduled April 9 official opening off the table, producers decided to close the show on March 21.

  • Postponed: “Flying Over Sunset”

    The new musical by composer Tom Kitt (“Next to Normal,” pictured), lyricist Michael Korie (“Grey Gardens”) and book writer James Lapine (“Into the Woods”) was scheduled to begin performances on March 12 ahead of an official April 16 opening. On March 24 the Lincoln Center Theater announced the show’s opening would be pushed to the fall.

  • Postponed: “Birthday Candles” 

    Noah Haidle’s play, starring Debra Messing and Andre Braugher, was due to begin performances in early April. But on March 25, Roundabout Theatre Company announced it would open this fall instead.

  • Postponed: “Caroline, or Change” 

    Roundabout also delayed the opening of its revival of the Jeanine Tesori-Tony Kushner musical “Caroline, or Change,” starring Sharon D. Clarke in an Olivier Award-winning performance. The show had been set for an April 7 opening at Studio 54.

  • Postponed: “How I Learned to Drive” 

    Manhattan Theatre Club announced on April 7 it was postponing a Mary-Louise Parker-led revival of “How I Learned to Drive” to the 2020-21 season. The Pulitzer-winning drama, with David Morse as co-star, was due to open April 22, just before the cutoff for this year’s Tony Awards.

  • Postponed: The Tony Awards  

    Since there’s no word yet on when Broadway performances might resume, the Broadway League on March 25 indefinitely postponed this year’s Tony Awards, which had been scheduled for June 7 at Radio City Music Hall.

“How I Learned to Drive” is the latest affected

When New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo closed Broadway theaters on March 12 in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the New York theater scene was heating up ahead of the Tony Awards — with 31 shows playing and another eight scheduled to begin performances by mid-April. But the uncertainty of when theaters (and Broadway-bound tourists) might return has forced some producers to close shows early — or push new productions to sometime in the future.

Source: Read Full Article