Derelict hospital chapel in Chelsea goes on sale for £7.5m

Derelict 170-year-old hospital chapel in Chelsea goes on sale for £7.5m but new owner will have to spend £5m to turn it into a home – worth up to 25m

  • St Luke’s Chapel, located in Chelsea, is the former chapel of the Royal Brompton Hospital in west London
  • The Grade II listed building was built in Kentish rag and Caen stone in 1850 by architect Edward Buckton Lamb
  • The property, which is on the market for £7.5million, could be worth a potential £25million once completed

A derelict hospital chapel that has lain empty for almost 30 years has hit the market for £7.5million- but the new owner will still have to pay another £5million to transform the unoccupied site into a home. 

St Luke’s Chapel, which is nestled in a leafy Chelsea and is the former chapel of the Royal Brompton Hospital in west London, was built in Kentish rag and Caen stone in 1850 for the sum of £2,500 to the designs of the architect Edward Buckton Lamb.

However in recent years, the Victorian building has remained unoccupied, although its stonework and stained glass windows have been restored in partnership with Heritage England.

Now back on the market, sellers hope that once the work to convert the 170-year-old building to the approved plans is complete, the property could be worth a potential £25million. 

St Luke’s, which was built in Kentish rag and Caen stone in 1850 and is located in Chelsea, London, has hit the market for a staggering £7.5million

The buyer of the old chapel (pictured inside) will have to pay another £5million to transform the unoccupied site it into a home


While the Grade II listed building has remained empty in recent years, its stonework and stained glass (left and right) windows have been restored in partnership with Heritage England

Following an application to convert the historic site into a residential building, local planners have approved the plans and intend to transform the once derelict chapel into a five-bedroom house. 

The plans, which were approved by the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, will also see the site increase its living space from 4,257sq ft to around 7,000 sq ft.

Estate agents Russell Simpson said it could have a ‘stunning vaulted living room and snug’, a kitchen, master bedroom with en-suite and dressing room on the ground floor, as well as a guest suite and a conservatory.

The Grade II listed building also has space for a staff bedroom and a guest WC on this level.

The first floor will have a vaulted study/library, another master bedroom and two further bedroom suites which will have their own dressing rooms and en-suites.

Artistic impression images for the chapel show how the potential conversion could look, with marble flooring and walls, dual staircases and light flooding in through the roof.

The cost of the conversion – estimated at just over £5 million – will included a one off ‘service charge’ of £1.25million to compensate neighbours for noise and disruption during the construction.

An artist’s impression of what the finished home could look like once completed reveals a comfortable living room and grand archways

In another artist impression provided by the estate agents, buyers are shown a white marble floor and a stylish interior that allows for light to flood through


A step inside the derelict chapel, which is the former chapel of the Royal Brompton Hospital in west London, reveals a seating area used for prayer (left) and a tall gate (right) located in a hallway

The old chapel was converted to gated residential use between 1997 and 1999 and is now known as The Bromptons, Rose Square

Who was Edward Buckton Lamb?

Edward Buckton Lamb, who was born in London, was the son of government official James Lamb

The architect, who was labelled as a ‘Rogue Gothic Revivalist, went on to design St Luke’s Chapel in 1850

He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1824

In his life, Lamb went on to design a number of popular buildings across the UK including All Saints’ Church in Hartlepool, Episcopal Church in Dumfries and St Margaret’s in Leiston, Suffolk 

He also contributed to Loudon’s Encyclopaedia in 1833 and the Architectural Magazine between 1834-8

Lamb had previously been hired to organise alterations to Hughenden, the home of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli

The chapel, which lies at the back of the hospital’s former north block, was converted to gated residential use between 1997 and 1999 and is now known as The Bromptons, Rose Square, was designed by the renowned architect  Edward Buckton Lamb in 1850.

The architect, who was born in London and was the son government official James Lamb, exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1824. 

Labelled by some as a ‘Rogue Gothic Revivalist’, the architect, went on to design buildings across the UK including All Saints’ Church in Hartlepool, Episcopal Church in Dumfries and St Margaret’s in Leiston, Suffolk.

The architect also contributed to Loudon’s Encyclopaedia in 1833 and would regularly contribute  to the Architectural Magazine between 1834-8.

He had previously been hired to organise alterations to Hughenden, the home of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.      

The new owner would also acquire two underground parking spaces and use of The Bromptons development’s facilities, including a porter, 24/7 security, communal gardens, parking, a board room, and a swimming pool and gym at an extra cost of £70,000 a year.

Jake Russell, director at Russell Simpson, said: ‘The chapel is an excellent opportunity for someone to create their own, statement address with its own history and character. It’s perfect for someone looking for a unique home as well as privacy.’

He said the property would suit a family or an individual who wants a ‘London base with wow factor’.

The agency also believes that because of the wall-space, the property would also suit an art collector.

The chapel, which will be transformed into a five bedroom home, was designed by the renowned architect Edward Buckton Lamb in 1850

The plans, which were approved by the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, will also see the chapel increase its living to around 7,000 sq ft

 

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