FA redesigns Three Lions to reflect 'diversity' of English football

Fan anger as the FA redesigns Three Lions logo swapping them for one male lion, one lioness and one cub to ‘reflect the true diversity’ of the game

  • The Three Lions were dropped in favour of a lion, lioness and cub to show ‘the true diversity’ of English football
  • Some fans dubbed the rebranding of the logo as ‘PC nonsense’ on social media
  • FA bosses insisted the badge will increase grassroots participation in football

Fans hit out yesterday after the Three Lions were dropped in favour of a lion, lioness and cub to show ‘the true diversity’ of English football.

The rebranding was dubbed ‘PC nonsense’ by some on social media, with others asking ‘Who’s offended by a lion?’

Football Association bosses insisted the badge will help increase grassroots participation by symbolising ‘progression’ and ‘inclusivity’.

They said senior men’s and women’s teams ‘will continue to wear the traditional Three Lions crest, as they have done since the first ever international game in 1872’.

Fans hit out yesterday after the Three Lions were dropped in favour of a lion, lioness and cub to show ‘the true diversity’ of English football. Pictured: The new Three Lions logo

The sport’s governing body said the new design was launched as part of an initiative called England Football to increase participation in the game at an amateur level.

In a statement, the FA said: ‘A cub, lion and lioness unite to form the new England Football crest with no boundaries; representing everyone at every level of football across the country.’

This, the FA adds, ‘symbolises progression, greater inclusivity and accessibility in all levels of the beautiful game; from grassroots to elite.’

It said that the senior men’s and women’s teams ‘will continue to wear the traditional Three Lions crest, as they have done since the first ever international game in 1872’.

An angry reaction from the traditionalists was sparked 24 hours after the launch.

Critics said the use of the word ‘inclusive’ was a ‘desperately over-used term, used by desperate people’.

The sport’s governing body said the new design was launched as part of an initiative called England Football to increase participation in the game at an amateur level. Pictured: The original Three Lions logo on the England kit

Even those north of the border, who relish in England being beaten, expressed their astonishment on internet forums.

Duncan McDougall wrote: ‘Speaking as a Scot, it looks silly. It’s not a lion, a lioness and a cub, it’s a piece of rubbish design that would have been chucked out at any sixth form college in the UK.’

Richard Palmer added: ‘I’m a Scot, but is nothing bloody sacred?’

Michael Bentley said the ‘infiltration of wokeism continues’, adding: ‘Will anybody, anywhere, do something to save us?’

The lions as national symbols date back to the 12th century when Henry I, ‘The Lion of England’, added his wife Adeliza’s family lion to the one on his own shield.

After Henry II married Eleanor of Aquitaine in 1154, the lion on her family crest made it three.

Richard the Lionheart’s standard featured three golden lions which have appeared on the Royal Arms of every succeeding monarch.

The crest was adopted by the Football Association in 1863 and has been used on England shirts ever since.

Mark Bullingham, chief executive of The FA, said: ‘This is a significant change as we unite all our grassroots initiatives and programmes under one banner.

‘[It] will harness the unique ability of the England teams to inspire future generations and positively impact participation at all levels of the game.’

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