Family reveal effects of Covid on their 'strong and happy' father

Family reveal the devastating effects of Covid on their ‘strong and happy’ father who was left unable to walk or talk by the virus and will be in hospital until CHRISTMAS

  • Family of man who was put into induced coma due to Covid have told of effects
  • Mark Moore, 59, tested positive for the virus in January and was taken to hospital
  • His condition worsened and he suffered bleed on lungs due to complications
  • Father-of-three ‘unable to walk and talk’ and could be in hospital until Christmas

The family of a ‘strong and happy’ man who was put into an induced coma due to coronavirus have revealed how he was left unable to walk or talk by the disease and could be in hospital until Christmas.

Mark Moore, 59, tested positive for the virus in January and was taken to Nottingham City Hospital during the second wave triggered by the so-called Kent variant.

After being sent home, he was taken place to hospital after his condition worsened – forcing doctors to put him into an induced coma on January 14. 

His devastated wife Kelly and daughter Paighton told Nottinghamshire Live this week how Mr Moore, from Gedling, is now relearning how to walk and talk – and is expected to remain in hospital until Christmas.

Miss Moore, who has two older brothers Jordan and Brandon, said their lives had been ‘changed forever’ by their father’s illness and is urging people to be cautious despite the low death rate and vaccine roll-out.  

Mark Moore, 59, tested positive for the virus in January and was taken to Nottingham City Hospital during the second wave triggered by the so-called Kent variant

His devastated wife Kelly and daughter Paighton told Nottinghamshire Live this week how Mr Moore, from Gedling, is now relearning how to walk and talk

After being sent home, he was taken place to hospital after his condition worsened – forcing doctors to put him into an induced coma on January 14 

Mr Moore’s daughter told the website that he was just ‘seconds away from life and death’ and said hospital staff refused to allow them entry.

‘We even asked for a photo but they couldn’t do that,’ she said.  

‘While he was in a coma we received three phone calls saying choose two people to come in because they were going to turn [his life support] off. He was seconds away from life and death. But he was a fighter.

‘The real long-Covid has not kicked in yet. We were given a date to say when he was going to come out and that was next year, but now they have brought it forward to Christmas.

‘It is going to be a long journey. He is learning how to eat again and he is having to learn how to stand up.’

His wife added: ‘It has been awful thinking someone you love is going to die and planning for his funeral. You can push him to do something but the next three days he is in bed again because it takes it out of him. 

‘Just talking takes it out of him.’

The family said doctors reduced Mr Moore’s sedation from February 25 to March 3, but he did not fully regain consciousness for another few days

Mr Moore had only just recovered from a heart attack in 2020, making him highly vulnerable

The family said doctors reduced Mr Moore’s sedation from February 25 to March 3, but he did not fully regain consciousness for another few days.

Two weeks after he had come out of the coma, he could not move by himself.

Mr Moore had only just recovered from a heart attack in 2020, making him highly vulnerable to coronavirus. His battle with the disease caused a number of life-threatening complications, including bleeding on his lungs. 

On June 22, Mr Moore was finally able to walk with support for the very first time.

His daughter added: ‘Your body just shuts down, it does not cope at all. We’ve had over 100,000 deaths in this country and people do not think it is real.

‘It is happening, just look around you. 

They are all fantastic at City Hospital, they are the most fantastic and caring nurses and they asked us if we were okay every day.

‘Just stay safe. It is not worth whatever it is that you are doing. It is going to change our lives forever.’  

Who is at high risk from Covid-19?

People at high risk from coronavirus are those who:

  • have had an organ transplant;
  • are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy;
  • are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer;
  • are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors);
  • have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma);
  • have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine;
  • have been told by a doctor you have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD);
  • have a condition that means you have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell);
  • are taking medicine that makes you much more likely to get infections (such as high doses of steroids or immunosuppressant medicine);
  • have a serious heart condition and are pregnant;
  • have a problem with your spleen or your spleen has been removed (splenectomy);
  • are an adult with Down’s syndrome;
  • are an adult who is having dialysis or has severe (stage 5) long-term kidney disease;
  • have been classed as clinically extremely vulnerable, based on clinical judgement and an assessment of your needs.

People at moderate risk from coronavirus are those who:

  • are 70 or older;
  • have a lung condition that’s not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis); 
  • have heart disease (such as heart failure);
  • have diabetes;
  • have chronic kidney disease;
  • have liver disease (such as hepatitis);
  • have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy);
  • have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections;
  • are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids);
  • are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above);
  • are pregnant. 

Source: NHS

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