Homemade submarine ‘stolen and taken for a joyride’ is found

Homemade submarine ‘stolen and taken for a joyride’ is found floating in San Francisco Bay

  • Authorities in the Bay Area found a floating submarine near Bay Bridge
  • The submarine belongs to Shanee Stopnitzky, a marine scientist
  • She says someone stole the submarine and took it for a joyride
  • Sub is used by a volunteer group that uses manned submersibles 

Authorities in the Bay Area have found a floating homemade submarine that was initially thought to be a downed aircraft but was later learned to have been stolen.

Shanee Stopnitzky, a marine scientist, built Fang Tooth, a two-person sub that can reach 30 feet below the surface of the water and has enough air to last 30 minutes.

She says that somebody stole the sub and took it for a joyride, KGO-TV reported.

The Alameda County Fire Department tweeted photos of the sub after they pulled it out of the water near the Bay Bridge, which connects San Francisco and Oakland.

Authorities in the Bay Area have found a floating homemade submarine that was initially thought to be a downed aircraft but was later learned to have been stolen


The Alameda County Fire Department tweeted photos of the sub after they pulled it out of the water near the Bay Bridge, which connects San Francisco and Oakland


Shanee Stopnitzky, a marine scientist, built Fang Tooth, a two-person sub that can reach 30 feet below the surface of the water and has enough air to last 30 minutes

The sub is used for the volunteer group The Community Submersibles Project, a cooperatively owned club where ‘anyone can learn how to use’ manned submersibles.

‘It’s about giving people access to explore the oceans in a way where they ordinarily would never have access to,’ Stopnitzky said.

She said she was surprised that nobody got injured since operating the vehicle could be tricky for someone who hasn’t been trained.

‘One of my biggest concerns is if someone might kill themselves in it,’ Stopnitzky said.

‘It’s a simple set of systems, but you still need knowledge of how submarines work.’

The sub was towed to an impound lot, and it will now cost the club $2,000 to recover it.

Stopnitzky said that her club currently doesn’t have the money. 

Source: Read Full Article