Moment yobs scream 'f*** her' as they harass BBC reporter live on air

Moment seven yobs scream ‘f*** her’ as they sexually harass BBC reporter live on air in Brighton

  • Fiona Irving was covering local bin strikes when her broadcast was interrupted
  • A young man jumped into shot and swore, followed by six other men cheering
  • She later took to Twitter to say: ‘It’s not funny. It’s misogynistic. Just calling it out’

This is the moment a group of yobs hijacked a live news broadcast to shout sexist obscenities down the camera.

Journalist Fiona Irving was covering bin strikes in Brighton and Hove, East Sussex, for BBC South East yesterday when her piece to camera was suddenly interrupted.

Just as she was showing viewers how locals’ waste hadn’t been collected, a young man jumped into shot, shouting: ‘F*** her right in the p****!’

Six other men then made their way across the screen, cheering, as Ms Irving was forced to pause her broadcast.

News anchor Chrissy Reid then said: ‘Oh dear, apologies for the interruptions there.’

The reporter later tweeted about the incident, writing: ‘Reporting live on the refuse collectors strike in #Brighton today when around 7 men jumped in front of the camera shouting aggressive and threatening terms. 

‘It’s not funny. It’s misogynistic. Just calling it out.’

This is the moment a group of yobs hijacked a live news broadcast to shout sexist obscenities down the camera

Journalist Fiona Irving was covering bin strikes in Brighton and Hove, East Sussex, for BBC South East yesterday when her piece to camera was suddenly interrupted

Just as she was showing viewers how locals’ waste hadn’t been collected, a young man jumped into shot, shouting: ‘F*** her right in the p****!’

It comes as Dominic Raab bizarrely claimed today that misogyny is applicable to both men and women in a bungled backing of Boris Johnson’s refusal to make hatred against women a crime amid a brewing row over women’s safety following the Sarah Everard murder.

The Justice Secretary made the remark during an interview with BBC Breakfast today while discussing a new inquiry which will look at the ‘systematic failures’ that allowed Miss Everard’s killer Wayne Couzens to be employed as a Metropolitan Police officer.  

Mr Raab told presenter Sally Nugent: ‘Misogyny is absolutely wrong, whether it’s a man against a woman, or a woman against a man.’ Ms Nugent then interjected, correctly telling him that the dictionary definition of misogyny is hatred against and directed towards women.

What is misogyny? 

According to Merriam-Webster, misogyny is ‘hatred of, aversion to, or prejudice against women’.

The word is formed from the Greek roots ‘misein’ (‘to hate’) and ‘gyne’ (‘woman’).

It can also be distinguished from the word sexism, which means ‘discrimination based on sex’.

Later in the interview, Ms Nugent offered the Justice Secretary the opportunity to clarify what he meant, reading back his comments and asking: ‘Is that what you meant to say?’

Mr Raab then continued to restate the Prime Minister’s position that misogyny should not be made a hate crime and did not address his earlier remark. He did not acknowledge referring to misogyny as being applicable to men as well as women.

‘What I meant is if we are talking about things below the level of public order offences of harassment, intimidation, which are rightly criminalised,’ he said.

‘If we are talking about effectively insults with a sexist basis I don’t think that criminalising those sorts of things will deal with the problem that we have got at the heart of the Sarah Everard case, which is a question partly around the police but also the broader question and the fear women face that their cases don’t get to court and don’t end up with a conviction.

‘And therefore just criminalising insulting language even if it’s misogynistic doesn’t deal with the intimidation and the violence and the much higher level of offence and damage and harm that we really ought to be laser light focused in on.’ 

Seizing on Mr Raab’s apparent confusion over the meaning of misogyny, Labour’s Shadow Justice Secretary David Lammy thundered: ‘Justice Secretary Dominic Raab doesn’t know the definition of misogyny. No wonder the Conservatives are hopeless at tackling violence against women and girls.’


Justice Secretary Dominic Raab (left) awkwardly claimed that misogyny is applicable to both men and women as he backed Boris Johnson’s refusal to make hatred against women a hate crime (right, the Prime Minister)

Shadow Women and Equalities Secretary Anneliese Dodds tweeted: ‘The man in charge of our justice system literally doesn’t understand the meaning of the word misogyny. If you don’t understand it, how can you tackle it?’

Liberal Democrat equalities spokeswoman Wera Hobhouse said: ‘It’s little wonder the Conservatives are failing to tackle misogyny when their Justice Secretary doesn’t even seem to know what it is. These comments are an insult to the millions of women and girls impacted by misogyny and show just how out of touch the Conservatives are on this issue. ‘

And the Women’s Party wrote on social media: ‘It’s no wonder our government won’t initiate an independent inquiry specifically into police misogyny – they don’t even know what the word means.’ 

Yesterday the Prime Minister brushed off calls to formally recognise misogyny as a hate crime, instead arguing the ‘abundance’ of existing laws should be better enforced rather than new legislation brought in. 

Mr Johnson has vowed to make domestic violence and rape the ‘number one issue’ he tackles within policing, and said the way police and criminal justice system currently handles violent crimes against women was ‘just not working’.  

His comments come amid a brewing national row over women’s safety in the wake of the killings of Miss Everard and primary schoolteacher Sabina Nessa, with thousands sharing their experiences of feeling unsafe on streets, parks and other public areas in Britain.

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