Nearly 100 people killed and nine rare rhinos are drowned in floods

Nearly 100 people are killed and nine one-horned rhinos are drowned as floods ravage India, displacing 2.75million

  • Intense rain and flooding in Assam, India, has killed at least 84 people since May
  • Nine rhinos and over 100 other animals have drowned at Kaziranga National Park
  • Officials warned water level of the Brahmaputra river was expected to rise again

Nearly 100 people have been killed and nine one-horned rhinos have drowned as floods continue to ravage India.

Intense rain in the state of Assam has killed at least 84 people and displaced more than 2.75 million since May, authorities revealed earlier today.

Rescue teams are also attempting to recover the carcasses of nine rare rhinos that have drowned in the past 10 days.

Intense rain and flooding in the state of Assam has killed at least 84 people and displaced more than 2.75 million since May, authorities revealed earlier today (forest guards pictured retrieving animal carcasses from the flood water)

Nine one-horned rhinos have also drowned at the Kaziranga National Park with others at the site forced to seek refuge on higher ground (pictured)

Authorities are not only battling the extreme weather conditions but are also struggling to keep villagers separate amid the coronavirus pandemic as they are driven from their homes and huddle in shelters.    

‘It’s hard to enforce social distancing when people are being ordered to move away from the rising waters,’ said Sanghamitra Sanyal, a member of the northeastern state’s flood management force.

‘We’re urging people to at least cover their mouth and nose with a piece of clean cloth.’ 

Kaziranga National Park (pictured) is home to the world’s largest concentration of one-horned rhinoceros with an estimated 2,500 out of a total population of some 3,000 of the animals

Authorities are not only battling the extreme weather conditions but are also struggling to keep villagers separate amid the coronavirus pandemic as they are driven from their homes and huddle in shelters (pictured along the river Brahmaputra)

It comes as officials warned that the water level in the Brahmaputra river was expected to rise again by 11 cm (rhinos pictured in flood water at a wildlife sanctuary in Pobitora, Assam)

The floods have also inundated the Kaziranga National Park, home to the world’s largest concentration of one-horned rhinoceros, with an estimated 2,500 out of a total population of some 3,000 of the animals.

‘Nine rhinos have drowned and over 100 other animals have been killed,’ said Atul Bora, Assam’s agriculture minister who is Kaziranga’s member of the state parliament.

With the park waist-deep in water, rhinos, elephants and deer have been forced to seek refuge on higher ground such as roads and in human settlements. 

Rights groups accuse corrupt officials of siphoning off funds meant for flood projects, resulting in shoddy construction of embankments which are often breached (a one-horned rhino pictured in flood water at a wildlife sanctuary in Pobitora, Assam)

Assam, famous for its tea plantations, is hit by flooding every rainy season despite flood-control efforts (pictured villagers huddled under temporary shelter)

It comes as officials warned that the water level in the Brahmaputra river was expected to rise by 11 cm (4.3 inches), just two weeks after it burst its banks swamping more than 2,500 villages.

Assam, famous for its tea plantations, is hit by flooding every rainy season despite flood-control efforts.

Rights groups accuse corrupt officials of siphoning off funds meant for flood projects, resulting in shoddy construction of embankments which are often breached.

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