Serial killer Denis Nilsen’s had secret fling with fellow prisoner

Serial killer Denis Nilsen, who chopped up and cooked his victims, had a secret fling with fellow prisoner, secret letters he wrote in jail reveal

  • Nilsen penned newly-uncovered letters about his romance with a man named ‘Jimmy’
  • The depraved murderer complained that the Home Office stopped Jimmy returning to visit him after being freed 
  • Last week Nilsen was rushed to hospital with stomach pains and died of complications from an emergency abdominal op

Serial killer Denis Nilsen has revealed his secret relationship with a fellow prisoner in secret letters he wrote in jail.

According to an article by the Mirror, Nilsen, who died last week aged 72,  penned newly-uncovered letters about his romance with a man named ‘Jimmy’.

Nilsen, who killed up to 16 men in North London, enjoyed a fling at maximum security HMP Whitemoor, Cambs.

The depraved murderer complained that the Home Office stopped Jimmy returning to visit him after being freed.

Nilsen, who died last week aged 72, penned newly-uncovered letters about his romance with a man named ‘Jimmy’

Nilsen, who killed up to 16 men in North London, enjoyed a fling at maximum security HMP Whitemoor, Cambs (pictured being interviewed at the Albany Prison, Isle-of-Wight)

Nilson, who cut up and cooked victims, also revealed that 200 love letters from his homosexual friend disappeared in what he labelled as a homophobic plot against him.

He wrote: ‘My affair was called Jimmy. We were companions.

‘The Home Office banned him from visiting me for the rest of our lives. They don’t like ex-cons and they like ex-con p***s even less.

‘The prison dept is run by a load of s***s. Prior to Jimmy’s release they confronted [stole] all 200 of my letters to him. That’s the sort of trash they are when dealing with people’s most private ­property.

‘I too am not promiscuous and I’ve come to terms, in many ways, with the isolation and homphobia one feels in prison.

‘Yes, there is a distinct pecking order in prison. There are gangs but I keep to myself because I find the tastes in the subculture extremely boring.

‘The average con is as thick as two short planks (all mouth and trousers).

‘However on a social level most of them can be quite friendly whilst keeping their distance.

‘Nobody likes to be seen associating with a known gay.

‘I am the only man in this s***hole who admits openly to being gay – there are others who are firmly locked inside the closet of their heads.’

Last week Nilsen was rushed to hospital with stomach pains. He died of complications from an emergency abdominal op.

He confessed to murdering either ’15 or 16′ young men, only putting him behind Harold Shipman as the UK’s most prolific murderer.

The murderer’s sick fantasies started his killing spree from 1978 to 1983 which saw him dismember his victims and perform sex acts over their corpses. 

Nilsen wrote: ‘I did a sex offender treatment course in 1994 lasting six months. It did me no good by their ­reckoning because after it they wrote that I was still very dangerous.

‘They keep my level of dangerousness artificially high and the same to justify the Home Secretary’s political decision in making me a ‘whole life’ prisoner.’

Nilson, who cut up and cooked victims, revealed that 200 love letters from his homosexual friend disappeared in what he labelled as a homophobic plot against him

One of Britain’s most notorious serial killers leaves the Highgate Court in north London after being heard by the investigating judge

After neighbours complained to the landlord about the horrific stench from the drains at their flats in Muswell Hill, North London, Nilsen was arrested. 

A plumber found the pipes were full of human remains. Nilsen was jailed for life in 1983, with a recommendation he serve at least 25 years.

He was convicted of six counts of murder after dismembering many of his victims, with the majority of them being homeless young gay men.

While imprisoned he bragged that he would not conform to prison rules and said serving in the Armed Forces was much tougher than jail. 

Nilsen wrote: ‘I am my own man and lead a life marginalised from official machinations.

‘It was much rougher serving in the British Army in the 60s and early 70s.

‘Imprisonment is a state of mind, not a physical thing.

‘Standing up to the power and ­adversity of prison has greatly ­strengthened my soul.’ 

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