What is a no confidence vote and how many MPs need to support it to topple the government?

But what is a vote of no confidence, and how is this one different from the one she faced in early December? Find out here…

What is a motion of no confidence?

There are two kinds, and neither are the least bit palatable for a sitting PM.

One involves a motion of no confidence being moved in the House of Commons with the wording "that this House has no confidence in HM Government".

The backing of a majority of MPs would topple the Government.

The other kind – which occurred within the Tory Party on December 12 – saw Tory MPs write to the chairman of the backbench 1922 Committee expressing no confidence.

The required 48 MPs wrote letters expressing their desire for a vote of no confidence to the backbench 1922 Committee, triggering an anonymous ballot to decide their leader's fate.

How many MPs need to support it to topple the government?

If the vote is backed by a simple majority of MPs, the government will be toppled.

If a new Government with the support of the Commons cannot be formed within 14 days, an early general election is called.

It is one of only two ways in which an early general election may be triggered under the terms of the Fixed Term Parliaments Act 2011.

The other kind – which occurred within the Tory Party on December 12 – saw Tory MPs write to the chairman of the backbench 1922 Committee expressing no confidence.

Will Theresa May stay in power?

Yes – for now at least.

A critical proportion of Tory MPs – 15 per cent – filed letters expressing no confidence in Mrs May's leadership after she pulled a doomed-to-fail vote on her Brexit deal from Parliament.

But a resulting vote on her leadership on December 12, 2018 – the first in nearly 40 years – proved not to be the end of her political career.

May secured 200 votes from Tory MPs, giving her an 83 vote majority.



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