I spent £17k on boob jobs to boost my confidence, but implants left me so sick I thought I’d die & now I can’t have kids

A WOMAN who has spent over £17,000 on boobs jobs to boost her confidence has revealed that implants made her so sick that she feared for her life.

Shelby Kennedy, 34, from British Columbia, Canada, went under the knife for the first time in 2012 after a divorce and abusive relationship left her confidence at an all-time low.

The £3,700 surgery took Shelby from a 32C to a 32DD and left Shelby feeling like a "new woman".

But three months later, the businesswoman began to feel tired, depressed, and she started to regularly develop large cysts on her ovaries.

She said: "At first, I loved my new breasts. Right or wrong, I believed they made me feel powerful, sexy and ‘like a new woman’ which at that time, is what I thought I needed.

"It took three months for the symptoms to start. At that time, I told myself – like many women do – that I was just getting older. Bodies change and these things happen – that kind of dismissive self-talk."

Although she was given prescription opioids to help with the pain when ovarian cysts ruptured, Shelby continued to suffer from painful periods and cystic acne.

After suffering a ectopic pregnancy, in late 2012 Shelby was diagnosed with endometriosis – a condition where tissue similar to the lining of the womb starts to grow in other places.

She continued: "It was only when I came to have an ectopic pregnancy removed that I was told my reproductive system was affected by endometriosis.

"I was shocked. I’d never heard the term – let along known anything about the disease and the heart-breaking path I was unknowingly embarking on.

"The next few years were full of chronic pain and the loss of three further pregnancies."

With her new husband Tyler, Shelby underwent IVF treatment and gave birth to daughter Mackenzie in 2015.

Shelby explained: "My pain had subdued during the pregnancy, but it returned when my daughter was one year old – and with a vengeance.

"I was living in a fog – trying to manage motherhood, post-partum depression and the relentless feeling that I couldn’t cope. I just accepted that things were the way they were."

In 2017, Shelby woke up to intense swelling in her left breast and an ultrasound soon revealed that she had a late stage seroma – a build-up of fluid around the breast.

My pain had subdued during the pregnancy, but it returned when my daughter was one year old – and with a vengeance. I was living in a fog – trying to manage motherhood, post-partum depression and the relentless feeling that I couldn’t cope.

Fortunately, doctors confirmed Shelby had tested negative for breast implant associated cancers and the mum chose to pay £8,600replace her implants.

She added: "“I was told to either remove the implants or replace them. Still very much governed by those unhealthy thoughts [from her abusive relationship], I replaced them. They healed up nicely and I went about my life."

One year later, Shelby could barely stand up as a result of her extreme chronic pain – which made everyday life as a mum to a toddler hugely challenging.

To cope, Shelby took more pain medication than she cared to admit but eventually decided she’d have to return to the doctors.

"I was taking more Tramadol in a day than I feel comfortable saying out loud," Shelby said. "I was advised that a hysterectomy could be my ‘hail Mary.’

“We’d have to say goodbye to another pregnancy, but it was in the hopes that I’d get my life back. I owed that to myself."

For the first six months after the surgery, Shelby had slowly started to feel normal again – but in February 2019, she woke up with bruising all over her legs and her energy levels plummeted.

Describing her "lowest moment", she said: "I felt like I was dying. I kept fainting. I couldn’t get out of bed.

"I could barely speak or remember anything. I had no control over my body and doctors couldn’t tell me why."


What is breast implant illness?

Shelby isn't the only woman to have raised concerns about breast implants.

A growing trend has emerged of women who've had implants getting them taken out – because they said they've made them ill.

It's not linked to the PIP implant scandal where women were given dodgy breast implants.

This involved implants made by French firm Poly Implant Prosthese using silicone meant for mattresses.

Although Breast Implant Illness isn't formally recognised ny the NHS, ancedotally it is reported on widely with a Facebook group boasting thousands of members.

The Sun's reported numerous cases of the condition where women who've had implants describe suffering symptoms such as sinus infections, migraines, food intolerance, eczema and night sweats.

Other women, like Sarah, have said they've suffered brain fog, aches and memory loss.

In April Austalian woman Emma Novotny told how she had her implants removed after they caused her agony.

Meanwhile, Kathy Richmond, from Reading, Berkshire, went from an A to a G cup – but had her implants taken out after she severe pain.

Former Playboy model Karen McDougal told in 2017 how she had her breast implants removed after they gave her blurred vision.

Gina Stewart, dubbed the 'World's Hottest Gran', said her boob job is poisoning her… after she got a £5,600 a year ago.

Annette Stevens forked out £6,000 to have her breast implants removed after she suffered a gel bleed

During this time, Shelby went to hospital on several occasions but never received a diagnosis – instead doctors told her she had functional neurological disorder because they couldn't link her symptoms to any specific disease or illness.

However in January this year, Shelby believes she finally found the answer to her health problems.

She said: "A dear friend told me she was having her implants removed because they were making her sick. This hit me like a tonne of bricks.

"I spent every waking moment researching breast implant illness – reading the stories of other women and just crying. My breast implants had been making me sick for all these years.

"How could it be that such a common procedure had stolen all those years of my life? I was saddened, appalled, and shocked but I finally had my answer."

To anyone thinking about getting implants, stop and think why you feel you need them. A man hurt me and made my question my worth and lovability. I should never have given I’m that power over my thoughts and feelings.

The following month, Shelby paid £4,600 to have her implants removed and described how it was an "emotional decision".

She said: "I immaturely believed they were a part of my identity which they weren’t. I am more of a woman now with my tiny, scarred natural breasts than I ever was with the enhanced ones.

"I believe, as do many other sufferers, that my implants gave me endometriosis and stole my reproductive system from me. That is a devastating blow to my heart and soul.

"For a long time, I identified myself as less than a woman and was disgusted by the fact that I was barren and could no longer give my husband the family he desired. I am constantly working on changing this kind of low self-worth."

Shelby hopes her experience will encourage other women to think carefully before going under the knife.

She added: "To anyone thinking about getting implants, stop and think why you feel you need them. A man hurt me and made my question my worth and lovability. I should never have given I’m that power over my thoughts and feelings.

"We are all so special, sexy and commanding in our own ways. There are risks associated with all surgeries. What are you willing to sacrifice for ‘perfect’ breasts?

"To those who think they may have symptoms, reach out to people – or to me. If you think something’s wrong, trust your gut. It’s the most powerful tool we have."

For more real life stories, this woman's ex called her an ‘ugly b***h’ and said it was ‘embarrassing’ to go out with her because of her nose – so she got fillers.

And this anorexia survivor who weighed just FOUR stone and was left bedbound for two months makes incredible recovery.

Plus this woman was rushed to hospital with no pulse, blind & dying – a TAMPON caused toxic shock syndrome but she thought it was the flu.

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