'Why wouldn't I?' Amanda Owen speaks about breastfeeding for 15 years

TV shepherdess Amanda Owen reveals she spent 15 YEARS breastfeeding her nine children because it was easier than fussing with a bottle when she was out in the fields

  • Amanda Owen, 46, has spoken out about breastfeeding non-stop for 15 years
  • Raises nine children with husband Clive on farm in Ravenseat, Upper Swaledale
  • Speaking on topic, she said: ‘When you’re lambing, what are you going to do?’

TV shepherdess Amanda Owen has spoken out about her decision to breastfeed her brood non-stop for 15 years and argued ‘why wouldn’t I?’ 

The Our Yorkshire Farm star, 46, and her husband Clive, 67, raise their children Raven, 20, Reuben, 17, Miles, 15, Edith, 12, Violet, ten, Sidney, nine, Annas, seven, Clementine (known as Clemmie or Tilly), five, and four-year-old Nancy on their farm in Ravenseat, Upper Swaledale.

And as the much anticipated new series of Our Yorkshire Farm returned to screens this week, the star has addressed breastfeeding her large brood for over a decade – suggesting that it’s easier than fussing over a bottle when she’s hard at work out in the fields. 

Speaking to Country & Town House, the busy mum-of-nine said: ‘Why wouldn’t I? It’s easy, the right temperature and when you’re out lambing, what are you going to do?’

TV shepherdess Amanda Owen (pictured), 46, has spoken out about her decision to breastfeed her brood non-stop for 15 years and argued ‘why wouldn’t I?’

Full house! The writer, 46, and her husband Clive, 67, share Raven, 20, Reuben, 17, Miles, 15, Edith, 12, Violet, ten, Sidney, nine, Annas, seven, Clementine, five, and four-year-old Nancy

It comes just days after she reflected on giving birth to her eighth child alone – and blasted ‘today’s snowflake generation’. 

The mum-of-nine recalled welcoming her daughter Clementine, now five, by the fire at her home while her husband Clive, 67, was sleeping as she appeared on Tuesday’s This Morning.  

On her unique birthing experience, the former model told hosts Alison Hammond and Dermot O’Leary: ‘The thought of just staying at home was a really good option. 

‘I got fed up of ruining people’s picnics, so I put the kettle on, stoked up the fire and just had her by the fire with my terrier as a birthing partner. 

‘I woke up my husband, but the matter of fact is quite simply he’s seen me give birth to seven children before.’  

In season four of her show, which premiered on Channel 5 on Tuesday, the reality star became emotional as she revealed her eldest son Reuben left the farm for a mechanic apprenticeship.  

Amanda and Clive with Raven, 20, Reuben, 17, Miles, 15, Edith, 12, Violet, ten, Sidney, nine, Annas, seven, Clementine, five, and four-year-old Nancy

Unique! On her unique birthing experience, the former model said: ‘I put the kettle on, stoked up the fire and just had her by the fire with my terrier as a birthing partner’

Earlier this month, the writer blamed parents for today’s ‘snowflake’ generation of children who cannot look after themselves. 

The sheepherder suggested today’s youngsters had ‘no sense of independence’ or work ethic.  

‘The snowflake generation, they can’t do anything,’ a harsh Amanda told the Radio Times.

‘They don’t know anything about how to look after themselves, or a work ethic, all of that has gone out of the window. It’s our fault as parents.

Leaving the nest: In season four of her show, set to premiere on Channel 5 on Tuesday, the reality star becomes emotional as she reveals Reuben has leaves for an apprenticeship 

‘If you put your child on a pedestal, with no sense of independence, and think you have got to entertain them the whole time, what can you expect?

‘I rebuff swaddling children, because I want to see them go on and do well and be themselves, whatever that is. I feel like it is their life and all I do is prepare them.

‘What we do on the farm, hopefully, is preparation for the big world. The lessons they get here will stand them in good stead.’

The Channel 5 star added that she had wanted her children to make the most of the independence she has allowed, including when it comes to home-schooling.

She detailed: ‘We logged in for about a week. Then I threw it back to them. Children have to be independent. I can’t be a helicopter parent.

Following in mummy’s footsteps: Clemmie (pictured L) rehomes a lost chick and the girls find a brood of fledgling kestrels nesting in one of their traditional stone hayloft

‘We read the papers and they show me some of their projects, but I have yet to be at a single parents’ evening. I did pretty poorly at my exams, but look at what I have achieved since then.’

Amanda met her husband in 1996 when he was already divorced with two children, after she arrived at his farm as a 21-year-old trainee shepherdess. 

By the time she came to deliver daughter Clemmie, she had already decided she could handle the incredible task on her own. 

The animal enthusiast said: ‘Our local maternity hospital is in Middlesbrough, which is 69 miles away, and on these roads, that takes a long time. So by baby number eight, I thought sod it, I’ll do it myself. 

‘I knew the baby was in the right position, so when I felt the familiar feelings I went downstairs and had the baby in front of the fire with my terrier as a birthing partner.

‘Clive wasn’t desperate to be at the birth, he was asleep upstairs. I went and woke him up with the baby. Of all the births I’ve had this one has to have been the best – it was the most relaxing, the most quiet, the most peaceful.’

Amanda grew up in a traditional three-bed house with her parents and one sibling in the large market town of Huddersfield. 

At 6ft 2in, the blonde was encouraged to follow the same career path as her model mother, but she hated the clothes and make-up that she had to wear. 

Harsh: Earlier this month, the sheepherder blamed parents for today’s ‘snowflake’ generation of children who cannot look after themselves 

Going strong: Amanda met her husband in 1996 when he was already divorced with two children, after she arrived at his farm as a 21-year-old trainee shepherdess 

She left her comfortable town life to work on farms around the country, but it’s when she knocked on the door of Ravenseat Farm that she found her calling. 

Many of her children help out on the farm when they are not at school – or travelling to and from as the journey takes one-and-a-half hours each way.

‘In order to make a big family work they all need to tow the line. It’s not about child labour – it’s about pulling together,’ Amanda told the Daily Mail in an article in 2018. 

With the nearest shop so far away – and the risk during winter that they could be snowed in for weeks – the TV star buys food in bulk, and manages to feed her large family for just £130 a week.

Their water is free, channelled from the stream on the moor, and they heat the house and water with a roaring fire, which burns every day no matter what the weather. 

Free spirits! The doting parent said she has instilled independence in her children (Owen is pictured with some of her children on the Moors)

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